Simulation Equipment

How Intelligent Device Monitoring Can Save Your Simulation System

How Intelligent Device Monitoring Can Save Your Simulation System 640 480 Level 3 Healthcare

Ditch Simulation System Downtime with Non-Cloud Monitoring

It used to be that the biggest threat to classroom training was a broken piece of chalk or a dead bulb in the overhead projector. As more and more medical training programs and healthcare facilities incorporate complex simulation systems and technologies, however, the number of things that can go wrong are increasing. And each of those glitches and the downtime they create can have negative impacts to classroom and training schedules and outcomes.

When a simulation system goes down, for example, classes get cancelled, and training plans and schedules fall behind. But the fix is often complicated and time-consuming. Simulation systems may include microphones, speakers, and cameras, as well as control rooms and debriefing software. For these complex systems, the best fix is the ability to identify issues early and respond to them rapidly. And that is exactly what Pulse IDM —an intelligent device monitoring system designed for the SIMStation solution—does.

The 24/7 monitoring provided by Pulse IDM can minimize problems that negatively impact the use of simulation systems and resolve issues that do arise more quickly and with less disruption to users.

Three Ways Pulse IDM Improves Simulation

  1. Proactively monitoring. Pulse IDM monitors all the devices in your simulation lab, including microphones, cameras, and speakers. By proactively monitoring each of these technologies 24/7, Pulse IDM can catch small issues before they turn into big problems, enabling Level 3 to resolve issues before they negatively impact the operation or functionality of the system. While Pulse IDM is designed specifically for the SIMStation hardware and software, it can be used with any simulation solution installed by Level 3.Lenny Convis, Director of Special Projects explains, “What makes Pulse IDM unique is that we have taken various opensource components and have tailored this system specifically for the hardware and software that we use within these simulation environments.”
  1. Increasing productivity and participation. Decreased downtime for simulation systems means you minimize training time lost to equipment failure and repairs. Proactively identifying and resolving issues that impact system functionality also eliminates user frustration that can impede consistent use of your simulation technology. Pulse IDM takes the burden of monitoring, managing, and maintaining simulation systems off the plate of IT teams and simulation techs, freeing up their time to focus on their more important strategic work. Finally, Pulse IDM performs remote system updates to minimize disruptions while the simulation system is in use.
  2. Keeping data secure. Pulse IDM is a small appliance, installed in your simulation room, that communicates directly with secure servers hosted by Level 3 Healthcare. All system monitoring is done internally, within your simulation network, keeping proprietary healthcare data out of the cloud.

Next Steps

Tired of technology glitches, system downtime, and decreased adoption of the system due to user frustration? Or hoping to avoid those things altogether? Fill out our contact form and a Pulse IDM representative will be in touch soon.

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3 Questions to Answer Before You Choose a Simulation Solution

3 Questions to Answer Before You Choose a Simulation Solution 2000 1333 Level 3 Healthcare

Cheap Simulation Systems Aren’t a Bargain—Here’s Why

If you are trying to decide between two pairs of navy blue socks and one costs $5 while the other costs $25, the decision is likely a no-brainer. When it comes to comparing and choosing simulation software, however, you shouldn’t make your decision based on price alone. Unlike socks, going with a lower-priced simulation system could cost you the functionality and ease-of-use you need to meet your objectives. And low quotes on simulation systems often don’t include AV installation and other ancillary costs, so your “good deal” often ends up being more expensive in the end.

So, if you can’t choose between simulation systems based on price, what should you be looking for? Here are 3 questions to ask yourself before you choose a simulation solution.

What You Need to Know Before You Choose a Simulation Solution

  1. Does the simulation system have all the features you need? You might be enticed by a low price, but does that price include all the features you need, such as recording, control room, and debriefing room software, as well as video streaming? Are you choosing a stationary system when you could make better use of a mobile one? If you have to add components or capabilities to a system after you’ve purchased it, you’ll probably end up spending more money than you would have had you invested in a more comprehensive system in the first place. You may run into usability and compatibility issues as well. For example, SimStation provides multiple configuration options so you can get the right mix of capabilities the first time.
  2. Is the quote comprehensive? Many vendors will present the lowest upfront cost to win your business and later apply change orders for AV installation and other ancillary costs. The only way to accurately compare simulation systems based on price is to make sure those prices include all desired features, installation, maintenance, and other support.
  3. Does the simulation software meet your program objectives? It doesn’t matter how cheap your simulation system is—if it doesn’t meet your needs and objectives, you’ve wasted your budget. And not only that, but the success of your simulation program itself could be in danger if you don’t have the right system to support it. If administrators are pressuring you to make budget the key factor in choosing a simulation system, you can help them understand why functionality has to come before price. Even if it costs more upfront, a solution that supports program success will be a better investment in the long-run.

Next Steps

The Level 3 Healthcare team includes designers and technicians with years of experience. That experience means they are prepared to help you choose the simulation system features that will benefit you most in the long run, and they’ll always be upfront about how much it costs. Ready to get started? Get in touch today.

Is It Time to Upgrade Your Simulation Technology?

Is It Time to Upgrade Your Simulation Technology? 2000 1226 Level 3 Healthcare

Is It Time to Upgrade Your Simulation Technology?

Just as medicine continues to advance, healthcare simulation—and the standards that govern it—are also evolving. It’s important that healthcare organizations keep up, but how do you know when and what parts of your simulation technology should be upgraded?

How to Tell It’s Time for Something New

Before you can decide how extensive of an upgrade your existing simulation AV requires, you need to know how to identify if and when an upgrade is required. Here are some symptoms of an aging or ailing simulation system:

  1. Users wish it did more. Faculty, staff, administrators, and other users should continually evaluate the simulation system and make note of features and tools that don’t meet their needs or expectations. Your audiovisual (AV) system provider or integrator might be able to address some of them. The rest will be critical data points when designing the next iteration of your simulation system.
  2. You plan to scale. There are two components to successful scalability. The first is whether your current system can grow with your program as it expands and evolves. For example, your current AV capabilities may not support your plans to expand. The second component of scalability is whether your existing solutions are compatible with newer technologies. At some point, those older technologies won’t be available for replacement anymore. If you are facing frequent compatibility issues, it’s time for an upgrade.
  3. You have trouble managing and maintaining it. If you don’t have AV experts on staff who can help you maintain and update your simulation solution, consider upgrading to a system that is easier to care for and that offers ongoing management and maintenance.

If you have discovered that you need an upgrade, how do you decide what kind of upgrade you need?

 

Renovation vs. Refresh: Which Do You Need?

A refresh means replacing and upgrading outdated equipment that’s part of your simulation system. Computers usually become obsolete in about five years, and the same is also true of your core AV systems. If your simulation system can support your projected growth but needs new peripherals or components, a simple refresh is enough to bring it up to date.

A renovation not only upgrades components that need to be repaired or replaced, it also expands features and functionalities, enabling your system to be compatible with future growth and needs. A renovation is an investment. Taking shortcuts that don’t address core shortfalls in your simulation system or improve user outcomes will ultimately cost more. To best plan for a renovation, you should: start documenting issues that impact the effectiveness of your program; assess whether or not your system can scale to meet your planned and desired system growth, and; get advice from experts and plan for the long term.

 

Next Steps

Whether you are undertaking a simple refresh or preparing for an extensive simulation renovation, input from AV experts is key to your success. The simulation experts at Level 3 Healthcare are here to help. Schedule a consultation today.