SIMStation

Case Study: University Simulation Center in Provo, Utah

Case Study: University Simulation Center in Provo, Utah 2000 1278 Level 3 Healthcare

Level 3 Healthcare successfully implemented SIMStation into a four-year University Simulation Center in Provo, Utah. This center was a retrofit from an existing AV system, and Level 3 Healthcare was brought in to add a new dimension of user feedback, as well as, provide the newest technology the industry has to offer.

This Simulation Center includes a total of seventeen rooms. Six simulation rooms for capturing and using manikins, five standardized patients or OSCE exam rooms, six control stations in a centralized control room, as well as, six debriefing rooms where participants can watch the event live or playback for review, after completion.

This Simulation Center is utilizing Level 3 Healthcare’s newest web-based software interface, allowing for the seamless integration between patient exam rooms and simulation training rooms while also providing flexibility for access anywhere in the center through their network. A tablet version of SIMStation was integrated by the Level 3 Healthcare team, allowing for annotations, bookmarks, and making the software readily available for debriefing.

The L3HC team brought over 22 years of experience and, with the help of their in-house subject matter experts, was able to design a state-of-the-art facility complete with high definition PTZ cameras, wireless microphones, full tablet connectivity, mannequin control, vital sign capture, and voice modulation devices, which allow for educators to change the voice of a mannequin to be a man, woman, child, or create a completely new voice. With this solution, the university was able to greatly improve their workflow management and increase their technology capabilities for years to come.

The simulation facility included:

SIMULATION ROOMS (6 TOTAL)

Each simulation room consists of two (2) PTZ cameras with zoom, two (2) encoders for capturing vital signals or other compatible video devices and includes a single ceiling microphone and a ceiling speaker for communication from control space. Each room will use an OFE speaker wall plate for connecting a portable speaker for in-room Voice of Patient (VOP), and one (1) wireless microphone. The wireless microphone can also be used for private communication between the control room and the simulation room.

EXAM ROOMS (5 TOTAL)

Exam rooms each include two (2) PTZ cameras with optical zoom, a single ceiling microphone and a ceiling speaker for communication from control space, an OFE speaker wall plate for connecting a portable speaker for in-room Voice of Patient (VOP), and one (1) wireless microphone. The wireless microphone can also be used for private communication between the control room and the exam room.

OPEN BED LAB (2 TOTAL)

The open bed labs consist of two (2) PTZ cameras with optical zoom. Each lab has a single ceiling microphone and a ceiling speaker for communication from control space.

WET/DRY TRAINING ROOM (2 TOTAL)

Each room is equipped with a client provided display to allow for live viewing of the training rooms. Wet room 1 shall consist of two (2) PTZ cameras with optical zoom. Each room includes a single ceiling microphone and a single ceiling speaker for communication from control space.

MED STATION (HALLWAY)

The med station in the hallway shall consist of four (4) PTZ cameras with optical zoom, one (1) ceiling speaker and one (1) ceiling microphone for communication from control space.

CONTROL STATION 1-SIMULATION ROOMS (4 TOTAL)

Each control space shall consist of a touch PC to run SIMStation software and control cameras and source selection. Two (2) desktop microphones shall be provided allowing an operator to speak to the simulation room, a confidant via their earbuds, or VOP. Desktop speakers are provided as well as three (3) headphone ports for discrete listening. A tablet is available for each station to remotely add notes to simulations. Each control station will include a telephone capture device. A voice changer device will be included for each control station. This will allow for voice modification to the connected room.

CONTROL STATION 2 EXAM ROOM RECORDING (1 TOTAL)

This control space shall consist of a dual touchscreen system with PC to run SIMStation multi-room software and control cameras and source selection. This station is specific to OSCE or multi-room type capture where all exam rooms shall be captured at one time. Two (2) desktop microphones shall be provided allowing an operator to speak to the simulation room, a confidant via their earbuds, or VOP. Desktop speakers are provided as well as three (3) headphone ports for discrete listening. A tablet is available for each station to remotely add notes to simulations. Each control station will include a telephone capture device. A voice changer device will be included for each control station. This will allow for voice modification to the connected room.

HEAD END SYSTEM

The head end system shall consist of a server-grade PC to transcode video, audio, and act as a central storage device for an interim period. All IP switches and audio processing shall also be housed at this head end rack. A rack is provided, but equipment can be integrated into an existing IT rack if enough space is available. Central network location to be determined later.

DEBRIEFING ROOM (4 TOTAL)

Each debriefing space is equipped with a client provided display to allow participants to view the debriefing software. Inputs to the display are the debriefing PC by default. Each debriefing space will consist of one (1) PTZ camera with optical zoom. Debriefing room 1 will consist of two (2) PTZ cameras with optical zoom. This will be controlled via the provided tablet or wireless mouse/keyboard. An HDMI input plate is also provided for each room for auxiliary input sources. This will automatically take over the debriefing PC when plugged in. Ceiling speakers are provided to cover the entire room evenly with audio.

DECOMMISSION OF EQUIPMENT

32-hours for the decommissioning of existing audiovisual equipment in simulation rooms, exam rooms, control room, and server closet.

TRAINING

Two (2) days of on-site training by certified L3HC staff.

PULSE IDM

3-year SIMStation Monitoring Service

 

For more information about this project, or pursuing a project for your own simulation lab. Please call 1-877-777-5328.

Simulation Provides Low-Cost, Low-Risk Nurse Training

Simulation Provides Low-Cost, Low-Risk Nurse Training 2000 1333 Level 3 Healthcare

Nurses are known for how busy they are since patient needs often can’t wait. And the nursing shortage means they need to focus on real patient care without the added responsibility of training students. In fact, a shortage of instructors is a big factor in why nursing schools turned away more than 56,000 qualified applicants in 2017.

Fortunately, in many instances, today’s simulation technology can take the place of clinical training in medical facilities.

The Benefits of Simulation in Nursing Training

The benefits of using simulation solutions to train nurses include:

  1. Nursing students face real scenarios. Simulation solutions allow students to practice treating patients with the same techniques they would use on real patients.
  2. They improve patient safety. With quality simulation training, nursing students can develop skills without risk to an actual patient. With recording and debriefing software, students learn what they did right and wrong in a scenario, as well as why.
  3. The training is thorough. With simulation, nursing students can train for scenarios that are rarely encountered in hospital or clinic settings but that are still important to be prepared for. In a clinical setting, illnesses and injuries are somewhat random, but in a simulated setting they can be carefully planned.
  4. Training is more efficient and cost-effective. Nursing schools can train students faster and more affordably with simulation solutions because students can test through more scenarios with fewer instructors.
  5. Nurses stay up to date. Nursing students can be easily trained in the latest medical treatments and techniques in patient care.

Simulation training can help nursing students improve their clinical skills, provide better patient care, build their confidence, and work better in teams. It’s important to have the right technology and resources in place for them to be successful.

The SIMStation Advantage

SIMStations are solutions designed specifically for medical simulations. They include all the necessary software, audio, and visual equipment needed for training, recording, and debriefing students.

In addition to providing effective, quality training of nursing students, SIMStations are economical and easy to install and help meet the needs of IT, educators, and administrators.

SIMStation solutions are flexible and upgradeable so that they grow with the institution’s nursing program—and there are even mobile options available. Developed by simulation experts, the solution contains all the tools necessary for high-quality training and for running a training room, control room, or debriefing room.

The SIMStation comes in a variety of product lines to suit the needs of any institution. There are also options for apps and management to improve the simulation experience. An experienced audiovisual partner can help institutions choose the simulation solution that best aligns with their goals.

Next Steps

Level 3 Healthcare’s team of medical engineers integrate audiovisual solutions into medical and healthcare settings. Our team can answer all your questions about simulation and also provide a free nursing school consultation. Level 3 can help you determine if the SIMStation is right for your institution. Contact us today.

4 Ways Simulation Technicians Add Value To Your Organization

4 Ways Simulation Technicians Add Value To Your Organization 1500 1001 Level 3 Healthcare

In a real life medical emergency, wasting time becomes a matter of life and death. In a simulated medical emergency an actual life isn’t on the line but wasted time can still be damaging. If an educator has to spend time on setting up the system, troubleshooting the system, or fixing glitches, time is taken away from critical teaching and learning. Simulation scenarios might be rushed or missed altogether if teachers spend the bulk of their time just trying to get a simulation system to work.

As institutions of higher learning—particularly those involved in medical training—increasingly incorporate simulation tools into their curriculums, investing in a dedicated technician to ensure the system runs smoothly is more important than ever.

4 Benefits You Get From A Simulation Technician  

Educators, IT pros and operations specialists often find themselves responsible for the operation and maintenance of simulation tools under the category of “other duties as assigned.” Many organizations don’t see the point in hiring a dedicated person to do a job existing employees seem to be managing just fine. But just because something is going fine doesn’t mean it can’t be better, and simulation technicians could be the key to unlocking additional productivity and ROI. Here are four ways simulation technicians can add value to your organization.

  1. Educators want to teach, not trouble shoot. Educators often become de facto simulation experts because they use the technology the most. Educators who have to set up and troubleshoot the simulation system are distracted from their core mission—to teach. If a simulation technician were available to prepare the simulation room, boot or reset the system, and address any issues as they arose, educators would have increased time for instruction, grading, mentoring and other responsibilities.
  2. IT departments have enough to do. Almost every IT department already has more than enough to do, and maintaining and monitoring a simulation system will likely fall to the bottom of an already long list. A simulation technician can relieve some of that burden by handling the day-to-day operations of a simulation system and freeing up the IT department to focus on more high-level, organization-wide concerns.
  3. Simulation solutions don’t exist in a vacuum. Simulation systems are not stand-alone tools. They have to interact and cooperate with other technologies, including network connections and AV equipment. Simulation technicians are perfectly positioned to be a full-time subject matter expert not only on the simulation system, but on how it integrates with other components. As simulation subject matter experts, simulation technicians can also advocate for the adoption and incorporation of simulation best practices.
  4. Time is money and sim techs save time. There is a lot of prep work that goes into a successful simulation user experience. It’s not as simple as booting up the system and diving in. For example, a room must be stocked with the right supplies. The simulation system itself has to be prepped and tested. Seamless simulation experiences also require someone to document and implement usage schedules, track and order supplies, work with vendors for support and collaborate with faculty members to understand what they need for each simulation scenario and prepare accordingly. That’s a lot to ask of someone who already has a full job description. A simulation technician, however, has the bandwidth and expertise to keep everyone on track and make sure students receive the necessary simulation training on time and without glitches.

Next Steps

The role of simulation technician is new to many organizations and the level of experience and skills among simulation technicians can vary. Taking advantage of training and certification opportunities, such as those offered by Level3, will ensure your simulation technician has the education and support they need to help you succeed.

Introducing Pulse IDM, A 24/7 SIMStation Monitoring Option

Introducing Pulse IDM, A 24/7 SIMStation Monitoring Option 1500 1001 Level 3 Healthcare

Why Healthcare Simulation Technology Is Vital

The first time a doctor has to resuscitate a patient, there’s a lot less riding on the outcome if the patient was never alive to begin with. Simulation training in healthcare allows students to learn with less pressure and more opportunities to hone their skills before they use them in a real healthcare setting.

Simulation systems are made up of numerous components that require monitoring, management, and maintenance. Your IT department can handle all of this for your organization’s simulation labs, or you can use a service that provides intelligent monitoring.

Without sufficient monitoring, devices can fail, resulting in canceled classes, blown schedules, and training plans falling behind. Organizers must reschedule classes, and with 15 to 20 students and observers in each class, equipment failure can be extremely disruptive.

A dedicated monitoring solution will prevent ill-timed device failures and provide more timely resolution should something go wrong.

 

Keeping Your Simulation Solution Healthy

If one of the cameras stops working in your simulation lab or center, will you know it before someone tries to use it? Will you know if it has simply gone offline or if only it is the device that has stopped responding? Is it experiencing an error?

Proactive monitoring will help prevent interruptions and delays often by correcting issues before anyone at the facility is even aware there was an issue. To find a solution that can be thorough, effective, and proactive, look for these features:

  • Secure communications
  • System updates
  • Automated failure recovery
  • Trends and utilization reporting
  • Customization and add-ons
  • Monitoring all simulation station hardware and software

The right solution for your organization will depend on the size of your simulation programs, the capacity of your internal resources, and the importance of your programs functioning and staying online at all times.

Specialized Intelligent Device Monitoring

The Level 3 Audiovisual intelligent device monitoring (IDM) solution—Pulse—has been specifically designed to monitor the SIMStation product. The solution often includes a simulation lab or room, a control room, and a debriefing room where students and teachers can evaluate what happened in the simulations.

The simulation room will feature devices like multiple cameras, microphones, and a speaker system. The control room will contain a compact server-case to house AV technology, recording software that is controlled by touchscreens, and a microphone for communication with other rooms. The debriefing room contains necessary software, displays for reviewing recordings, and a SIMStation tablet for control.

The Pulse monitoring device is a small appliance that monitors only the devices in your simulation rooms. It communicates securely to the Level 3 Audiovisual data center through an outbound connection, thereby eliminating firewall concerns. The monitoring center’s servers are not on the cloud but self-hosted at the center where the servers analyze incoming data, and technicians can immediately respond to issues.

From resetting devices to their default or standard settings—like mic volume, camera position, etc.—to arranging an on-site support visit, Pulse services monitor and address device performance issues. The goal is to minimize problems that would affect the client’s use of the SIMStation and reach a resolution more quickly.

Since Pulse is specifically designed to monitor SIMStation devices and software, it can more efficiently identify and address issues.

 

Next Steps

The Pulse IDM solution for SIMStation requires little to no interaction from the end user and eliminates the need for the IT department to monitor and maintain the hardware and software thus improving ROI of the simulation solution. Plus, the organization can confidently keep their training and simulation programs running smoothly and on time.

Contact us below if you have any questions about SIMStation or remote monitoring solutions.